Tel : 01234 241808

Contact Info

Olney Green Burial Ground

Yardley Road
OLNEY
Buckinghamshire
MK46 5EH

Tel : 01234 241808

Memorial Trees at Olney Green Burial Ground

Olney Green Burial Ground is destined to become a natural wood similar to other areas of woodland in the locality. Such woods contain many species of trees and the memorial tree planted on the graves can be chosen from the following native varieties.

Tree Planting
Memorial trees are usually planted during the dormant season - November to February. The trees are ordered in September/October in preparation for the planting and the selected tree type should be made known to the office as early as possible. Families are welcome to be present at the tree planting by arrangement with the office.

Memorial trees which fail during the 15 years following planting will be replaced without charge.

OAK (Quercus robur) - Commonly known as the English Oak. The favourite and probably most familiar will grow to 45m and live for a very long time. Producing the well know acorn the oak is also remarkable for the large number of wild life species it supports.

WILD SERVICE-TREE (Sorbus torminalis) is one of our lesser known native broadleaved trees, being almost exclusively confined to ancient woodland. The leaves are deeply lobed, similar to some Maples, these leaves turn from green to shades of gold and deep red in autumn.

SILVER BIRCH ( Betula pendula) - This well known and popular tree will grow quickly to around 30m and produces the attractive catkins from its twig tips. This tree is found widely but is not entirely suited to conditions at the burial ground and requires careful looking after until it is established. Relatively short lived the silver birch becomes vulnerable to wind damage as it ages.

WHITEBEAM (Sorbus aria) - Less well known than other tree types the whitebeam is related to the rowan, which is not suited to the local soil. Found widely in the area and growing to around 25m the whitebeam is recognisable by the white undersides of its leaves, especially in the spring, flowers in May and June and has red berries in the autumn.

WILD CHERRY (Prunus avium) - This large tree will grow to 30m, preferring edge of wood situations, where itsí pink to white blossom is widely seen in April and May. The familiar fruit is particularly favoured by birds.

HORNBEAM (Carpinus betulus) - This impressive tree will grow to around 30m but is often used for coppicing. Resembling the Hazel it has small beech like leaves and produces pendulous catkins.

CRAB APPLE (Malus sylvestris) - This familiar tree produces pink to white flowers in May and June followed by small hard fruits of yellowish-green flushed with red. It is a parent of the hybrid orchard apple.

Visitors to the burial ground will see that additional, smaller trees have been planted in some areas. These are to give support to the memorial trees and encourage the change to woodland and include thorn types, field maple, holly and hazel, which will be managed by coppicing. In time this will create an ideal environment for wild flowers such as bluebells.

WILD PEAR (Pyrus communis) With large oval leaves and clusters of white blossom in April and with good autumn colour this is an attractive tree that prefers a slightly sheltered position.

FIELD MAPLE ( Acer Campestre) A smallish tree growing to around 25m with a twisted trunk and winged seed pods. The palmated leaves turning yellowish or reddish in the autumn.

Visitors to the burial ground will see that additional, smaller trees have been planted in some areas. These are to give support to the memorial trees and encourage the change to woodland and include thorn types, virburnum, holly and hazel, which will be managed by coppicing. In time this will create an ideal environment for wild flowers such as bluebells

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